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Open Hearth Furnace At Us Steel Photograph by Chicago History Museum

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Comments (3)

Jill Siddall

Jill Siddall

The print of the Open Hearth at US Steel is a picture of my Father-in-law Wilson W. Siddall who worked for US Steel at South Works for 42 years. The original picture of him hung in the Museum of Science and Industry for many years. My husband, W. Robert Siddall started his career at US Steel and ended at Arcelor Mittal in Harrisburg. He was in management and worked for 51 years.

Jill Siddall

Jill Siddall

The print of the Open Hearth at US Steel is a picture of my Father-in-law Wilson W. Siddall who worked for US Steel at South Works for 42 years. The original picture of him hung in the Museum of Science and Industry for many years. My husband, W. Robert Siddall started his career at US Steel and ended at Arcelor Mittal in Harrisburg. He was in management and worked for 51 years.

Jill Siddall

Jill Siddall

The print of the Open Hearth at US Steel is a picture of my Father-in-law Wilson W. Siddall who worked for US Steel at South Works for 42 years. The original picture of him hung in the Museum of Science and Industry for many years. My husband, W. Robert Siddall started his career at US Steel and ended at Arcelor Mittal in Harrisburg. He was in management and worked for 51 years.

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Open Hearth Furnace At Us Steel by Chicago History Museum
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